Courgette – Romanesco

If you want to grow a well behaved courgette with flavour then you won’t go far wrong with this one. It’s slightly slower growing and less high yielding than other varieties which actually means you can have a couple of plants and not have neighbours running away from you in case you give them yet another courgette. It’s quite pretty too with it’s slightly erratic stripes.

If you want to grow a well behaved courgette with flavour then you won’t go far wrong with this one. It’s slightly slower growing and less high yielding than other varieties which actually means you can have a couple of plants and not have neighbours running away from you in case you give them yet another courgette. It’s quite pretty too with it’s slightly erratic stripes.

In the Kitchen – Consistently the best I have tasted. Courgettes are thin skinned and tender and cook well, especially when harvested on the small side. Romanesco is good courgette to eat raw because of its intensity and sweetness of flavour.

Plant health & yield – It has an RHS award and plants are robust and healthy. It’s not resistant to downy mildew. The courgettes are supposed to have quite distinct ridges and but my seed does not, possibly the seed merchant has had some cross pollination or I’m just too keen to get them off the bush before the ridges develop. Yield in the UK is lower than some other varieties but benefits from it through more intense flavour.

Grow

Sow in late April to May undercover. I like to sow in root trainers which are long thin pots which split open to release the plant for planting. They are ideal for big seeds or plants that don’t like having their roots disturbed. Fill the root trainer with compost. Push one to two seeds per root trainer about 1.5 cm deep. Water and top up with compost if needed. Keep moist but not damp. If the squash gets too big for the root trainer before you can plant in the ground you will need to plant in to a larger pot. You will probably have to pot on at least once before planting out. The addition of heat in the form of a propagator or warm room when sowing will increase success.

Plant out after all risk of frost has passed, with each plant at least 1 meter apart.  Squash are sprawling plants that like to grow in full sun, in a very fertile but well drained soil, enriched with copious amounts of well rotted manure. Water well at the base of the plant during warmer weather. A stick placed at the base of the plant on planting out can be a useful way of finding the base again once your squash plant has turned in to a monster. Just as it is hard to over water your squash, it is almost impossible to overfeed it. These are hungry plants and will relish weekly feeding

Alternatives

Zuccini

Patty Pan Sunburst F1