Potato Arran pilot

Growing your own has certain advantages, the sweetness of sweetcorn taken straight from the plant and plunged in to boiling water, peas eaten straight from the pod. A third is choosing plant varieties, many of which have superior eating qualities but do not store well so are not stocked by supermarkets.

Arran pilot is one of those. First developed in the 1930’s it was never commercially a success but is a favourite among allotmenteers. It is a first early potato so one of the earliest to be harvested, from about mid June but starts to deteriorate in flavour and texture within about 2 weeks of harvesting so the only way you will try it is if you grow your own.

So why given it’s short shelf life has it stayed in the catalogues for nearly 100 years? The answer is that this is one of the tastiest first earlies and has a good yield, you just need to only plant enough for your immediate needs and possibly stagger your showings a little. Potatoes will be ready 10-12 weeks after harvesting. This as well as Lady Christl and Swift will be a regular feature on my plot.

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In the kitchen

Arran pilot is a new potato for boiling steaming or sauté. Ideally consume the same day you harvest. When young it makes a good waxy salad potato but will become more floury with age. Some can reach quite a large size so use them for baking.

Yield and plant health

Arran pilot has good resistance to Scab but not much else that affects the amateur gardener. However blight is unlikely to be a problem as it is a first early. Harvest 10-12 weeks after sowing when the potatoes will be about hens egg size, around mid June to mid July and harvest only as much as you want to eat each time.

Suppliers

Widely available from most good suppliers.

Mr Fothergills

Sutton’s

Thompson & Morgan

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Growing

When your seed potatoes arrive, remove them from the packaging and lay eye side up in egg boxes or on paper in a light, cool but frost free place. This is called chitting. You do not have to chit maincrop potatoes but unless you have ideal storage conditions they will start to sprout anyway so better to allow them to do it in the light.

In late march – early April dig a narrow trench about 10cm deep.  To improve yield you can line with compost or well rotted manure but it will make the potatoes more prone to slugs. You can water in some nematodes if it is warm enough who will infect any nearby slugs and will offer some protection for 6 weeks. You can repeat by watering them in when earthing up but make sure you are watering the soil not the foliage.

Space the seed potatoes 40cm apart in rows 30cm apart. Cover the potatoes with the soil from the trench. When the halms appear above the surface you will need to cover them with earth if there is sign of a frost coming. When they are about 20cm high you will want to draw soil about 15cm up the stems in to a flat topped ridge. This will reduce the likelihood of getting green potatoes due to light exposure as these are toxic. You can also earth up with a mulch of compost or straw.

Potatoes will not need much watering except in the driest of weathers when you would want to water well once a week. As a rule more water will lead to larger, but also more watery potatoes.

You can buy specialist potato fertiliser but a sprinkling of organic bone meal dug lightly in to the soil is probably all they will need, especially if you have dug in compost or manure on planting or have earthed up with compost.

Pests and diseases

Slugs – You can reduce the slugs by using nematodes watered in to the soil before planting.

Scab – Causes rough scabby patches on the potato skin and the flesh underneath. It is  unsightly and can affect storage potential. Any potatoes with scab should be used quickly.

Blight – Fungal infection that can devastate any potato crop that has no resistance.  Leaves will show browning patches, which get more and more prolific, including on the stems until the entire plant is covered. The foliage of any potato showing signs of blight should be cut down to the stems and removed.  The potatoes left in the ground for a week before being dug up. If not caught early, blight can infect tubers, which will rot in storage but some are more resistant that others. There is no non chemical cure but some varieties are resistant.

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